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Seven-seater tuk-tuk made in Aba, Nigeria? No, photos show four-seater manufactured in China

Two photos of a yellow three-wheeler tuk-tuk – known as a tricycle, keke and by many other names – has appeared in many Facebook posts with a claim it was made in Nigeria’s southeastern city of Aba, the commercial centre of Abia state.

THE IGBO MAN KNOWS HOW TO USE HIS BRAIN VERY WELL. 7 SEATER KEKE MADE IN ABA. CHECK THIS OUT,” one caption to the photos reads. 

Aba has a reputation for manufacturing and commerce. It’s populated by the Igbo people, like other parts of Nigeria’s south-east geopolitical zone.

But was the three-wheeler really made in Aba by Igbo people?

tuktuk_false

Photos from Alibaba e-commerce site

A Google reverse image search reveals that the photos were originally posted on Alibaba, a popular Chinese e-commerce website. 

The version on Facebook has been doctored, with the Alibaba URL blacked out. The undoctored version would have raised doubt about the made-in-Aba claim.

“Hot sale 2017 wholesale price 4 passengers three-wheeler taxi motorcycle for sale in Ethiopia,” the headline on the sales page reads. The price is from US$1,500 to $1,700.

Product information shows that these types of tuk-tuk were manufactured in Chongqing, China, under the brand name of Dayang.

Another sales page with the same photo suggests the three-wheelers were also sold in Bolivia.

The tuk-tuk was not made in Aba, and seats four, not seven. The photo was doctored to conceal evidence it was sourced from Alibaba.

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