Seven coronavirus victims shot dead in Rwanda? No, BBC post manipulated

Seven “victims” of the coronavirus have been “shot dead by unknown gunmen” in Rwanda, claims what seems to be a screenshot of post by BBC News, reposted on Facebook.

The screenshot shows a photo of Rwandan president Paul Kagame. One version includes the text: “The acts of kindness sparked by coronavirus.”

Did BBC News report that seven people infected with the new coronavirus were killed in Rwanda?

Doctored version of real BBC post

A strip of colour beneath the Kagame’s photo suggests that the screenshot may be a manipulated version of a real BBC Facebook post, with the photo overlaid on the original.

A Google search for the phrase “the acts of kindness sparked by coronavirus Facebook.com” returns a BBC News Facebook post dated 17 March 2020.

The post shows two smiling women – not Kagame – and links to a BBC News report on emergency appeals and volunteer work to help limit the impact of the UK’s coronavirus outbreak.

The post’s headline reads: “The acts of kindness sparked by coronavirus”.

Always verify coronavirus news

A reverse image search of the Kagame photo reveals that it was taken on 31 March 2011. It can be found on the Getty Images stock photo site, and on AFP Forum.

BBC News Africa has branded the post fake and urged people to always verify news, especially about the coronavirus.

“This article is fake and was not made by the BBC. We urge people to verify news stories at bbc.com/Africa to ensure they have accurate and reliable information about the coronavirus,” it posted on Facebook and Twitter. – Dancan Bwire


 

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