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Cash giveaway from World Health Organization? No, it’s a scam

A webpage posted on Facebook and WhatsApp in Kenya claims that the World Health Organization is giving cash to the public.

The page carries the WHO logo and text that reads: “Congratulations. You have been selected to benefit from the support provided by the World Health Organization for 500 Euros.”

It then asks users a series of questions, with each answer leading to a new page. After answering each question – the user’s job, for example – it displays a message: “After considering your answers, set the subsidy amount to 300 Euros and complete the steps to obtain the withdrawal code from the electronic counter.”

It also tells users that they “may get the subsidy with only one step” if they share the page with five groups or 15 friends on WhatsApp.

The page has been shared in several countries, as well as on popular Kenyan Facebook group pages, one with more than 130,000 members and another with over 20,000 members.



‘Fraudulent scheme’ – WHO


Posts that ask people to interact by liking, commenting or sharing are usually engagement bait scams. The more people interact with a post, the greater its reach.

No such offer has been published on any WHO official platform. And the WHO’s offices in both Europe and Africa have called the promotion a scam.

“This fraudulent scheme asks for personal information on individuals and despite using the WHO logo is not in any way associated with the organisation. WHO does not offer prizes or awards through emails or other messages,” the global health agency cautioned on 4 January 2021.

To further protect yourself against online scams, read our guide to Facebook scams and how to spot them. – Dancan Bwire




 

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