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Beware of imposter Jumia accounts on Facebook offering cheap deals – they’re out to swindle users

IN SHORT: Facebook users desperate for a good deal might be tempted by these posts posing as offers from Jumia, the popular African e-commerce site. But they’re scams and people should steer clear.

The Facebook accounts Jumia Online Shopping, Jumia online shopping, Jumia online shopping, Jumia Shopping Mall and JUMIA electronics are offering services and shopping discounts to Nigerians on Facebook.

These accounts use the name of Jumia, a popular e-commerce company operating in several African countries. It was founded in 2012 and is often referred to as the Amazon of Africa.

Electronic commerce, or e-commerce, is the buying and selling of goods and services over the internet.

A typical post offers 50% off on a cellphone, pictured, and reads: “HOT DEALS ON (INFINIX HOT 30i 8 unbox) CURRENTLY ON PROMO PRICE. AT 50% OFF PROMO TO ALL CUSTOMERS AND ENJOY AMAZING GIFTS FROM JUMIA.” 

The pages have thousands of followers, which may give them credibility to potential new followers.

Similar posts can be found here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here and here.

But are the promo offers real? We checked.

JumiaDeals_Scam

Imposter pages

By looking at their “page transparency” sections, we found that the Facebook pages highlighted were all created in 2023. This is suspicious.

Even though the pages each have thousands of followers, Jumia serves millions of Africans and so would be expected to have a larger number of followers on social media.

The official Facebook page of Jumia has 19 million followers and it was created in 2012. The page is also verified by Meta.

Africa Check showed interest in one of the products advertised on Jumia Online Shopping by messaging the account. The account asked us to pay money into an account to activate a promo code.

It then requested details for delivery, including name, address, phone number and email address.

Finally, it shared a PalmPay account number with us, with the name “Jumia (Arichlons)”.

The account claimed to be selling an Infinix mobile phone for N60,000 (about US$75). On the Jumia website the same product is for sale for more than N100,000 (about$125). This disparity is also a red flag that the offer is suspicious.  

Jumia made an official announcement to warn its customers of pages and websites posing as the company on social media. The post on X reads: “Please be informed that anyone transacting any business on such fake website(s) or unauthorised channels does so at their own risk.”

Many Nigerians are suffering financially, and could be tempted by these seemingly affordable deals. In reality, the accounts are only posing as Jumia and out to scam vulnerable users.

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